American Assets Trust (AAT)’s Stochastic Momentum Index is cruising higher and has passed the key level of +40, indicating possible oversold territory.  The SMI indicator was developed by William Blau ad presented in Technical Analysis of Stocks & Commodities magazine in 1993, ten years after the original stochastic was invented.  The oscillator fluctuates between -100 and 100, and as such the indicator can be readily used to identify overbought and oversold levels. Readings above +40 occur when the market is trading near the top of its recent price range. Readings below -40 occur when the market is trading near the bottom of its recent price range.

The primary goal for some beginner traders might be just trying to survive. Traders that are disciplined with their money management may be able to better ride out the bumps that come with inexperience. Amateur traders tend to put too much at risk which can increase frustration during an extended losing streak. The more capital that is lost, the more difficult it can be to recover. Markets can be cruel, and traders that jump in without proper preparation can get pounded. Taking the time to carefully prepare before putting hard earned money at risk can help when the inevitable sticky situations arise.

Active traders have a wide variety of technical indicators at their disposal for completing technical stock analysis. Presently, the 14-day ATR for American Assets Trust (AAT) is spotted at 0.73. First developed by J. Welles Wilder, the ATR may assist traders in determining if there is heightened interest in a trend, or if extreme levels may be signaling a reversal. Simply put, the ATR determines the volatility of a security over a given period of time, or the tendency of the security to move one direction or another.

Some investors may find the Williams Percent Range or Williams %R as a helpful technical indicator. Presently, American Assets Trust (AAT)’s Williams Percent Range or 14 day Williams %R is resting at -3.11. Values can range from 0 to -100. A reading between -80 to -100 may be typically viewed as strong oversold territory. A value between 0 to -20 would represent a strong overbought condition. As a momentum indicator, the Williams R% may be used with other technicals to help define a specific trend.

Investors may use multiple technical indicators to help spot trends and buy/sell signals. Presently, American Assets Trust (AAT) has a 14-day Commodity Channel Index (CCI) of 135.80. The CCI was developed by Donald Lambert. The assumption behind the indicator is that investment instruments move in cycles with highs and lows coming at certain periodic intervals. The original guidelines focused on creating buy/sell signals when the reading moved above +100 or below -100. Traders may also use the reading to identify overbought/oversold conditions.

The Average Directional Index or ADX is a popular technical indicator designed to help measure trend strength. Many traders will use the ADX in combination with other indicators in order to help formulate trading strategies. Presently, the 14-day ADX for American Assets Trust (AAT) is 33.00. In general, an ADX value from 0-25 would indicate an absent or weak trend. A value of 25-50 would indicate a strong trend. A value of 50-75 would signal a very strong trend, and a value of 75-100 would indicate an extremely strong trend. The ADX alone was designed to measure trend strength. When combined with the Plus Directional Indicator (+DI) and Minus Directional Indicator (-DI), it can help decipher the trend direction as well.

Taking a peek at some Moving Averages, the 200-day is at 40.24, the 50-day is 44.46, and the 7-day is sitting at 46.33. The moving average is a popular tool among technical stock analysts. Moving averages are considered to be lagging indicators that simply take the average price of a stock over a specific period of time. Moving averages can be very useful for identifying peaks and troughs. They may also be used to help the trader figure out proper support and resistance levels for the stock.

Successful traders often craft disciplined strategies when dealing with the stock market. These strategies can range from very simple to very complex. Following a specific strategy might help keep emotions on the sidelines when trouble comes. Conducting the proper analysis before things get out of hand can help ease the burden of market turmoil because the preparation has already started. The road to becoming a good trader may be long and winding. Keeping tabs on all the macro and micro economic happenings may seem like an impossible task. Focusing on the important elements can help keep the trader directed down the right path. There is obviously a lot to be learned by studying the markets, and there are rarely any shortcuts that can be taken to lasting success in the stock market.

Receive News & Ratings Via Email - Enter your email address below to receive a concise daily summary of the latest news and analysts' ratings with MarketBeat.com's FREE daily email newsletter.